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How To Tell Wild Animals Summary (CBSE Class 10) By Carolyn Wells

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How To Tell Wild Animals Summary CBSE Class 10 By Carolyn Wells
NameHow To Tell Wild Animals
TypeSummary
Class10
BoardCBSE Board
AuthorCarolyn Wells

How To Tell Wild Animals SummaryShort

Stanza 1:

“If ever you should go by chance

To jungles in the east;

And if there should to you advance

A large and tawny beast,

If he roars at you as you’re dyin’,

You’ll know it is the Asian Lion…”

In the first stanza, the speaker sets the scene for the poem by imagining a scenario in which someone is traveling through the jungles in the east and encounters a large, tawny beast. The speaker suggests that if the creature roars at the person as if they are dying, they will know it is an Asian lion.

Stanza 2:

Or if some time when roaming round,

A noble wild beast greets you,

With black stripes on a yellow ground,

Just notice if he eats you.

This simple rule may help you learn

The Bengal Tiger to discern.

In the second stanza, the speaker provides a simple rule for identifying the Bengal tiger. The stanza suggests that if someone is roaming around and comes across a noble wild beast with black stripes on a yellow ground, they should notice if the beast eats them. This humorous and absurd advice implies that encountering a Bengal tiger would likely result in an attack, and therefore one would learn to identify the tiger by the experience.

Stanza 3:

“If strolling forth, a beast you view,

Whose hide with spots is peppered,

As soon as he has lept on you,

You’ll know it is the Leopard.

‘Twill do no good to roar with pain,

He’ll only lep and lep again.”

In this third stanza, the speaker provides a rule for identifying the leopard. The leopard is described as having a spotted hide, and if one encounters a beast with these markings and it leaps on them, they will know it is a leopard. The stanza also suggests that roaring with pain will not help, as the leopard will continue to leap and attack again.

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Stanza 4:

“If when you’re walking round your yard

You meet a creature there,

Who hugs you very, very hard,

Be sure it is a Bear.

If you have any doubts, I guess

He’ll give you just one more caress.”

In this fourth stanza, the speaker provides a humorous rule for identifying a bear. If someone is walking in their yard and encounters a creature that hugs them very tightly, they can be sure it is a bear. The last two lines suggest that if there are any doubts about the creature’s identity, the bear will give them one more tight hug to confirm.

Stanza 5:

“Though to distinguish beasts of prey

A novice might nonplus,

The Crocodile you always may

Tell from the Hyena thus:

Hyenas come with merry smiles;

But if they weep they’re Crocodiles.”

In this fifth stanza, the speaker provides a rule for distinguishing between a crocodile and a hyena. The first two lines suggest that it can be difficult for a novice to identify predators. However, the rule for distinguishing between a crocodile and a hyena is to observe their expressions. Hyenas are described as having merry smiles, whereas crocodiles are known to weep. This humorous comparison between the expressions of the two animals provides an easy way to tell them apart.

Stanza 6:

“The true Chameleon is small,

A lizard sort of thing;

He hasn’t any ears at all,

And not a single wing.

If there is nothing on the tree,

‘Tis the chameleon you see.”

In this final sixth stanza, the speaker provides a rule for identifying a chameleon. The chameleon is described as a small lizard-like creature with no ears or wings. The final two lines suggest that if there is nothing visible on a tree, it is likely because a chameleon is hiding there, blending in with its surroundings. This rule highlights the chameleon’s ability to camouflage and adapt to its environment.

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How To Tell Wild AnimalsLong

The poet describes many wild animals in a fascinating and enigmatic manner. These animals are quite harmful, but the poetess is presenting them one by one in a very playful manner. She begins by describing the Asian lion. She claims that if you go to the eastern forests and witness an animal with golden skin that can roar, you might pass out from fear. It shows that we observed an Asian lion. She then described the Bengal tiger as a royal creature that instantly hunts and tries to kill a man. She jokes that if we are killed and eaten by this stunning black-striped animal, we have undoubtedly found a Bengal tiger.

She continues by saying that if we come across an animal with black spots on its skin and it jumps on us, it is probably a leopard. She also warns that screaming in unbearable pain may be ineffective because the leopard would keep attacking the person. The bear is next introduced, who will, according to her, provide a really tight hug. Because bears can crush a person to death by hugging him strongly.

She also challenges the readers with the query of whether they are aware of how to identify predatory animals. Then she goes on to explain that hyenas always have a smile on their face and also that crocodiles have tears in their eyes. The death of their prey is clearly seen. The Chameleon is the last animal she describes on the list. According to her, the creature is similar to a lizard but has wings and ears. Only with this knowledge will we be able to distinguish between lizards and chameleons. She goes on to state that the chameleon has the power to change its colour depending on its surroundings and surface.

To illustrate this, she explains that if we look at the tree and only see the tree, it is almost probable that a chameleon is perched on it. And it has already changed from green to brown, exactly like the tree branch.

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About The Author

Carolyn Wells is the poem’s poetess. The poetess gave a colourful and lively description of the animals. If someone has the opportunity to enter an Asian jungle & a huge, terrifying animal approaches them, we need to know so we can identify them.

Conclusion

She claims that if you go to the eastern forests and witness an animal with golden skin that can roar, you might pass out from fear. It shows that we observed an Asian lion. She then described the Bengal tiger as a royal creature that instantly assaults and tries to kill a man.

FAQs on How To Tell Wild Animals Summary

What are the characteristics of wild animals?

Wild animals are typically untamed and not domesticated. They live in natural habitats such as forests, deserts, and wetlands, and are usually not accustomed to human presence. They have adaptations that help them survive in their environment, such as camouflage or sharp claws.

How can you tell if an animal is wild or domesticated?

One way to tell if an animal is wild or domesticated is by observing its behavior. Wild animals are typically more skittish and may be more aggressive if they feel threatened. Domesticated animals, on the other hand, are often more accustomed to human presence and may be more docile. Physical characteristics, such as size and color, can also be used to distinguish between wild and domesticated animals.

How can you tell the difference between a male and female wild animal?

There are a few ways to tell the difference between a male and female wild animal. In some species, males may have larger bodies, antlers, or manes. Female animals may have smaller bodies, or may have certain physical characteristics such as mammary glands. However, in some species, it is difficult to tell the difference without more detailed observation.

How can you tell the age of a wild animal?

Determining the age of a wild animal can be difficult, as it often requires a close examination of the animal’s teeth, bones, or other physical characteristics. In some cases, a wildlife expert may be needed to accurately determine the age of an animal. Some signs of aging in animals include gray fur, wrinkles, or a decline in physical condition.

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